Poem – Faithful Stars

Well hello! Can you believe it’s already Saturday again? It seems that each weekend seems to come faster and faster as time goes on. Or maybe just time is going faster and faster as I get older? 😀 I don’t know, but time sure seems to be spinning by at a crazy speed for me… This week has been very busy for me, as I’ve been redecorating my bedroom. We’ve repainted the whole room, plus painted some furniture, and gone on several shopping trips, and we still have to put up pictures and nail shelves into the walls. Needless to say, it’s been slightly crazy around here this week!

So due to the lack of time to prepare anything else for this week’s blog post, I’m falling back onto another poem. I’m hoping to start writing and posting more of a variety of things on here, but I need to get the time to write them first! Hopefully I’ll manage to somehow capture that time soon.. 😀 Anyways, here’s the poem – let me know what you think of it!

stars

 

When God created the heavens,

he stretched the vast expanse of night sky

over the dome of earth

and poked holes

in the dark

black vastness.

Then he sprinkled

liberal handfuls

of glistening stars

all over the canopy of black

light and dark

mixed together

like salt and pepper,

like diamonds against black velvet.

And they nestled

and settled

and shone out of the darkness

through the holes

over the dark

and silent world.

Now,

thousands of years later,

the same stars

still shine

like fiery diamonds

or gleaming raindrops.

Ever present

like our ever present God

reflecting his design,

his power,

his beauty.

As I gaze up

At the great

black

bowl of sky,

with the myriads of stars

clustered and sprinkled

everywhere

I’m reminded of:

How small I am.

How great God is.

And how faithful

he is

in his love

for us.

For as the stars continue on

night after night,

year after year,

century after century,

never changing

in their constancy,

intensity

and beauty

So God’s faithfulness will continue on

night after night,

year after year

century after century

never changing

in its constancy

intensity

and beauty.

For,

his love endures forever,

his faithfulness throughout all generations.

 

stars 2

 

Advertisements

Poem – What if?

Have you ever had something just write itself, and then you look back later and aren’t exactly sure how that came out of your brain? I’ve had a couple poems like that, and I’m going to be sharing one of them today. Re-reading it, I can’t remember under what circumstances I wrote it, and I’m not even sure if I fully agree with the message of it. But, it came out of my head, so I must have had some ideas about the subject before I wrote it! 😀 So let me know what you think – do you agree/disagree with it? Why?

question mark.jpg

WHAT IF?

‘What if?’

Is the great questioning shadow

Over humanity.

 

‘What if?’

Is the eternal question

That will never be answered.

 

‘What if?’

Tells the story

Of question marks.

 

‘What if

I had tried?’

‘What if

I had risked it?’

‘What if

I had taken the leap of faith?’

 

The nagging question

The haunting question

The question that lingers

In the dim corners of

Humanity’s brain

The question of

‘What if?’

 

The reminiscent question

The haunting question

That weakens the foundation

Of all our decisions

The question of

‘What if’?

 

Humanity seems unable

To always fully look forward

They always look behind

And the

‘What ifs’

Trail like shadows

In their wake

 

Doubts

Fears

Tremulous questions in the dimness of the night

Uncertainties

Suspicions

Nagging whispers piercing bubbles of happiness

 

‘What if?’

 

I wish I could remind people

In the moment of decision

That it is better

To say ‘oops’

Than ‘what if?’

It is better

To live with a lifetime of experience

Than a with lifetime of regret

A lifetime of asking ‘what if’?

 

Because

When you try

At least you know what happens

When you don’t try

You will never know

 

And you are left with

‘What if’

Ringing in your ears.

 

*Note: This is my 20th post on ‘The Way of Delight’, and this blog has been around for nearly 4 months now! Thank you all for sticking with me on this journey!

 

 

Top 3 Books – August 2017

Wow, can you believe it’s already September? Summer is over and done, and I’m sad about that… 😦 Summer is my favourite time of the year, and if I could I would make it doubly longer! 😀 Alas, I do not possess that power. Let me know if you know of any special trick to stop time from going so fast, I’d like to know about it. 😛

So school has started back up for pretty much everybody school aged by now. I’m going into my Junior year (of high school, for all my American readers) / Year 12 (first year of Sixth Form for all my English readers). It’s kind of scary how old I am now! 😀 And seeing how fast time has gone by recently, it seems very probable that before I know it, I’ll be graduated and done and dusted with school. Yikes! :O

To distract from that scary thought, let me tell you about my top three books that I read in August. There were some good ones!!

 

the westing game

The Westing Game – Ellen Raskin

Sam Westing is dead. He left behind a will. Which is actually a game. A game with the objective of finding out who killed him. He has chosen a random, yet very specific group of 16 people to play this game. And the wild card? One of those 16 people is the murderer. Does it sound interesting? It’s even better than it sounds. 

Seriously, this book is waaaaayyy better than it sounds. And it sounds pretty interesting to begin with! This mystery is incredibly well written – the characters are fresh, believable and unique, and the story line… well it’s SO good. Seriously, Ms. Raskin must be half-genius to come up with the plot line and the crazy twists. And the ending – man it comes out of nowhere and is so clever!! I don’t feel like anything I say can give a true idea of how cool this book is, so my advice to you is – go read it! 😀 This is a solid, most-definite 10* read. (and I’m recommending for about ages 12+)

 

Gods-and-Kings-Lynn-Austin

Gods and Kings – Lynn Austin 

A nation with their backs to God. A King bending to the mighty Assyrians’ dominion. A priest haunted by the deaths he has caused. A Prince angry and bitter against his Father. And a God who refuses to leave them alone. 

Looking back in the archives of my blog, I can’t believe that I haven’t mentioned Lynn Austin before! Apart from L.M. Montgomery, she is my favourite author. She writes historical fiction – some of the best I have ever come across. I’ve read most of her historical fiction, but I have never ventured into her Biblical historical fiction before. Until this month. And as always, she did not disappoint! She tells the story of King Hezekiah’s childhood in godless Jerusalem before he ascended the throne. Surrounded by idol worshipers, with the mighty Assyrian empire breathing down his country’s back,  Hezekiah’s story is one of great tension, but also of great redemption. God is after his people, and he won’t stop at anything until he gets their attention and brings them back to him. He might even us a prophet or two… maybe one called Isaiah? It is very evident that Ms. Austin has done immense amounts of research into every aspect of his historical time period in order to make this story accurate and compelling. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and my only complaint is that it finished and now I have to get my hands on #2 in the series. 😀 I’m giving ‘Gods and Kings’ 9* out of 10 and recommending for ages 14+

 

God's smuggler

God’s Smuggler – Brother Andrew 

God has the power to make seeing eyes blind. Especially when his Word at stake. 

God is a God of miracles. It says so in the Bible, but sometimes it’s hard to believe. But after reading this book, I was struck again by God’s power and sovereignty. This is the story of one young man that had a dream to see Bibles taken behind the Iron curtain. This also the story of how God made that dream come true. There is really no other word to describe the many narrow escapes, perfectly timed meetings, and anonymous monetary gifts that are chronicled in this book other than ‘miraculous’. God’s hand of guidance was so clearly outlined in this story. I came away from the book in awe at how God worked in order to get his Word into the hands of persecuted Christians, and encouraged by the fact that he is still doing that today! I’m giving it 9* out of 10, and recommending it for ages 14+. (due to some explicit scenes)

That’s it for this week! Hope you enjoyed the monthly review of my favourite books.

Lets chat! Have you read any on this list? How’s back to school going for you?

 

Book Review – After the Dancing Days

It’s time for another book review! I have a seemingly endless list of books I’d love to share with you, so I’m slowly hacking away at it, one book review at a time. 😀

after the dancing days

Statistics:

Author: Margaret I. Rostkowski

Published in: 1986

Genre: Children’s/Historical Fiction

PoV: First Person

Number of Pages: 217

 

War is a senseless, horrible thing. And though the Great War was not fought in Annie Metcalf’s home country of America, its influence is visible months after the end. Scarred and broken young men trickle back into normal life, a constant reminder that life will never be normal again. And the absence of her favourite uncle is keenly felt. Her Mother says the best thing to do is to forget. Her Father spends his time working with injured soldiers in an army hospital in town. And Annie? Well, Annie is torn. Torn between the longing to forget the pain and blot out the ugliness of war, but the desire to remember her uncle and his fellow soldiers. The soldiers that are irrevocably scarred by the War and are trying to learn how to live their lives again in the hospital down the road. Strangely drawn to them, Annie is faced with a decision – to either dull the pain with forced forgetfulness, or to remember the pain and confront it in order to eventually overcome it?

I really enjoyed ‘After the Dancing Days’. I believe I read it in one sitting, if my memory serves me correctly. I was fascinated by Annie’s story – of how she learned to live with the scarring, painful aftermath of the Great War. The clear picture that Rostkowski painted of the veteran’s hospital, and the wounded inhabitants who were struggling to remake their lives with life-changing injuries (both physical and mental) was powerful and sobering. I found this story encouraging because it showed, through Annie’s story that pain can and does heal, through the memories that sweeten over time. Because often, the best way to heal the pain, is to remember, to honour, and then to move on, never forgetting what went on before and looking forward to the hope of the future.. This really was a wonderful book, and I’m giving it a solid 7* out of 10 and recommending it for ages 13+.

Thanks for reading! Have a great week! 🙂