Top 3 Books – June 2017

Well hey there! Happy July to everybody! I hope that you’re all enjoying the beginning of summer, and all the joyousness that that brings!

This month was a lot lower in ‘books-read’ than last month (only 13 as compared to May’s 27). Thus, my top books of the month has been culled down from 5 to 3 this time. But I still read some good ones, so let’s get onto some mini-reviews!

 

the crown and the crucible

The Crown and the Crucible Рby Michael Phillips + Judith Pella 

A servant and a princess. An unlikely friendship, but one that is destined to be much more than they ever imagined.

My Mum actually read this book when she was about my age, and so I was quite excited to read it! It’s quite a hunk of a book (410 pages) and it is chock full of history. Literally, sooooo much history. Which I find, as a history nerd, absolutely amazing!

It’s set before the Russian Revolution and details the lives of two very different girls, whose lives are entwined together in a fascinating story. This book takes you on a journey from humble peasant cottages to dazzling St. Petersburg ballrooms. It gives you a detailed look into the complex web that was Russian politics in 1876-78. It shows the personal lives of the fabulously rich royalty, as well as the peasants struggling to eke out a living from the land.

I devoured the book in about two days, unable to put it down due to the intriguing plot and captivating characters. I think that the immense amount of historical information in this book would probably be daunting to people who are not into history. But if you are, this is a book for you! This is definitely a solid 7* book, and I am recommending it for about ages 14+. And now I need to see if I can get my hands on the sequel! ūüėÄ

 

maniac magee

Maniac Magee Рby Jerry Spinelli 

One boy. Two sides of town.  One story.

Ayeeeee, this book. It hit me out of nowhere. I picked it up intending to read a chapter or two, and then an hour later I’d finished it. I was captivated from the first page.

It’s about Maniac Magee. A boy with no home, and who has a myriad of neighbourhood legends told about him. It’s about how one boy lived for a time on both sides of of a town split by prejudice. And it’s about how he mended the divide with some simple things: a ball of string, some baseball stories, a suitcase of books, a couple of friends, some strange sleeping places, butterscotch krimpets, and most importantly, love. It’s a powerful story about so many different things – finding family, breaking down prejudice, and showing that one person really can make a difference.

It may have been aimed at a lower audience than myself, but this book has a message that really is relevant to people of all ages. I’m giving ‘Maniac Magee’ a solid 8* out of 10, and recommending it for about 10+.

 

the song of the lark

The Song of the Lark – by Willa Cather

Beauty can  blossom in hardship, and determination is born out of adversity. 

This book was unexpectedly beautiful. I read it because it was the first in the trilogy, and I wanted to read the third one, but I decided I should read the first two first. (I know, not the most amazing reason to read a book :D) This was my first time reading anything by Willa Cather, and the experience was very positive!

The story chronicles the story of a girl named Thea Kronborg, and her journey to become an esteemed singer. Born into a large family in a small country town, she seems destined for a life of normalcy and drudgery, stuck in the cage of poverty and ignominy. But just like a wild lark cannot stay imprisoned in a cage for long, so Thea cannot stay imprisoned forever in her small town. The beautiful and untamed melody of her spirited determination will break free, her voice will rise, and the song of the lark will be heard. But freedom comes with a price. The gain of fame comes with the loss of innocence.

This book was written so beautifully, and captured the heart of the characters so well. It had its very depressing moments, but it had its very beautiful moments as well. The ending was the only thing that didn’t quite satisfy me. There were some questions I had that I didn’t feel get quite resolved properly. But the goodness of the rest of the book made up for it. I’m giving it a solid 8* out of 10 and recommending it for ages 14+.

That it for this week!

Let’s chat!¬†What have been your favourite reads of June? Have you read any of these books?

*Note: Just to let you know, I will be gone for the next two weeks on a missions trip. I will have scheduled posts going up, but I will not be able to moderate comments until I come back.